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Tutorial Program at the 6th International Conference on Cognitive Modeling, 29 July 2004

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Introduction: The Tutorials program at the International Conference on Cognitive Modeling 2004 will be held on Thursday 29 July 2004. It will provide conference participants with the opportunity to gain new insights, knowledge, and skills from a broad range of areas in the field of cognitive modeling. Tutorial topics will be presented in a taught format and cover a range of cognitive architectures. Tutorials at ICCM have been held before, and this year's program will be modelled after them and after the series held at the Cognitive Science Conference.

There is a student rate, and such students must bring their ID to show at registration.

Attendance at the tutorials does not require conference registration, but tutorial registration does not provide conference entrance. If you are not registering for the conference, you can register for the tutorials at the door.

Arrangements: There are four tutorials this year on Thursday 29 July (rooms to be announced on the day). They cost $40 (about 25 pounds or 35 Euros) for each half-day tutorial and $30 for students. Payment can be made using the registration site on the conference page, or can be paid for on the day (if space is available). The program includes handouts, and a tea and a coffee break (including biscuits). Lunch is available nearby in downtown Pittsburgh (Oakland). There will be a meeting of the tutorial committee and tutors after the tutorials, location to be announced at the tutorials.

Registration for tutorial attendees will be from 8.30 am on 29 July in the first floor lobby of LRDC. It should take less than 5 minutes to get from the tutorial desk to the tutorial rooms, but please allow yourself this time to get to the room.

If you have a lap top, please bring it to the sessions, as you will work in pairs in the tutorials.

The morning session includes a 15 min. coffee break, and the afternoon session includes a 15 min. tea break.

 Topics

CHREST, a Tool for Teaching Cognitive Modeling
Gobet and Lane, Half-day (1400-1715)
in the XXX LRDC, room to be announced

Building Cognitive Models with the EPIC Architecture for Human Cognition and Performance
Kieras and Hornof, Whole-day (0915-1230 and 1400-1715)
in the XXX LRDC, room to be announced

A Hands-on Tutorial for Building Agent Models in Soar
Laird, Whole-day (0915-1230 and 1400-1715
in the XXX LRDC, room to be announced

Development of Cognitive Agents Using the COGNET Architecture and iGEN Toolset
Zachary and Szczepkowski, Half-day (0915-1230)
in the XXX LRDC, room to be announced

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CHREST, a Tool for Teaching Cognitive Modeling

Half-day tutorial (1400-1715)
in the XXX LRDC, room to be announced

Fernand Gobet and Peter Lane
Brunel University and University of Hertfordshire
fernand.gobet@brunel.ac.uk

CHREST (Chunk Hierarchy and REtrieval STructures) is a comprehensive computational model of human learning and perception. It has been used to successfully simulate data in a variety of domains, including: acquisition of syntactic categories, expert behaviour, concept formation, implicit learning, and the acquisition of multiple representations in physics for problem solving. The aim of this workshop is to provide participants with an introduction to CHREST, how it can be used to model various phenomena, and the knowledge to carry out their own modelling experiments.

Participants in this tutorial will:

1. Acquire a comprehensive understanding of the CHREST computational model and its relation to the chunking and template theories of cognition;

2. Explore some key learning phenomena supporting the chunking theory by taking part in a verbal-learning experiment;

3. Attempt to match the performance of a CHREST model of verbal learning with their own data; and

4. Be introduced to the implementation of CHREST in sufficient detail to begin modelling data in their own domains.

Software will be provided for the experimental settings, as well as the CHREST implementation. Supporting documents and copies of published articles will provide complete details of the theory and the model.

Please bring a laptop with you and indicate this on the registration form. Our plan is to have tutees work in pairs, so not to worry if you can't bring one.

Fernand Gobet is Professor of Psychology at Brunel University. He previously was Reader of Intelligent Systems at the University of Nottingham. He started working on the CHREST architecture in collaboration with Herbert Simon during his stay at Carnegie Mellon (1990-1995). In addition to developing the CHREST architecture, his scientific interests include: methodology of computational modelling; empirical research into expert behaviour, including its neural correlates; the psychology of board games; natural and artifical intelligence; and the fusion between perceptual and conceptual knowledge.

Peter Lane is a Lecturer at the Department of Computer Science at the University of Hertfordshire. He was introduced to CHREST when working as a Research Associate for Fernand Gobet at the University of Nottingham. In addition to work with CHREST, research interests include: machine learning, computational linguistics, and neural networks.

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A Hands-on Tutorial for Building Agent Models in Soar

Whole-day tutorial (0915-1230 and 1400-1715)
in the XXX, room to be announced

John Laird
University of Michigan
laird@umich.edu

The tutorial will provide participants an understanding of the details of Soar so that they can create simple Soar programs. This will be a full-day hands-on tutorial that starts with an overview of Soar, its history, goals, and previous research done with it. The rest of the morning will emphasize understanding the syntax and structure of the architecture (the memories and processes), and the emphasis in the afternoon on agent development. In the morning, participants will learn to run, modify, and debug small demonstration programs that illustrate the various parts of Soar's structure, including it new reinforcement learning component. They will also be introduced to Soarās editing, debugging, and runtime tools. In the afternoon, we will work on simple agents that interact with a dynamic simulated environment. The students will build their own complete agents that navigate and compete in a simple maze world (see sitemaker.umich.edu/soar for more details).

Please bring a laptop with you and indicate this on the registration form. Our plan is to have tutees work in pairs, so not to worry if you can't bring one.

Prerequisite knowledge: We expect participants to have some general programming experience and a basic understanding of symbolic processing. No prior knowledge of Soar or rule-based systems required.

John E. Laird is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan and Associate Chair of the Computer Science and Engineering Division. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Carnegie-Mellon University in 1983. His research interests spring from a desire to understand the nature of the architecture underlying artificial and natural intelligence. He is one of the original developers of the Soar architecture and leads its continued development and evolution. Over the last ten years he has been developing autonomous agents for military simulations and interactive computer games. His current research includes extending Soar through the addition of reinforcement and episodic learning. He is a Fellow of AAAI. 

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Building Cognitive Models with the EPIC Architecture for Human Cognition and Performance

Whole-day tutorial (0915-1230 and 1400-1715)
in the XXX, room to be announced

David Kieras
University of Michigan
kieras@eecs.umich.edu

Anthony Hornof
Department of Computer and Information Science
University of Oregon
hornof@cs.uoregon.edu

The EPIC cognitive architecture developed by Kieras & Meyer (www.eecs.umich.edu/~kieras/epic.html and www.umich.edu/~bcalab/epic.html) works especially well for modeling perceptual-motor intensive tasks, multiple tasks, and complex multimodal task environments with many objects and events. The underlying theory has inspired fundamental empirical work and influenced other cognitive architectures.

This tutorial presents an opportunity to become acquainted with EPIC. The goal is to learn enough about EPIC to decide whether it will be useful in one's research, and if so, to get quickly started in the full use of it. Hands-on exercises will alternate with presentations of EPIC's mechanisms and facilities and how to use them. The exercises will cover two topics: Visual search, in which non-uniform visual acuity and eye movements play a critical role, and dual-task performance, in which different executive strategies for task coordination determine the overall level of performance.

The only programming involved is writing production rules, so fluency in a conventional programming language is not required. A laptop (Macintosh or Windows) will be necessary, individually or shared, for the hands-on exercises. The EPIC software will be provided. Useful readings and the software can (and should!) be downloaded in advance from ftp://www.eecs.umich.edu/people/kieras/EPICtutorial.

Please bring a laptop (Mac or PC is fine) with you and indicate this on the registration form. Our plan is to have tutees work in pairs, so not to worry if you can't bring one.

David Kieras is a Professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Psychology Departments at the University of Michigan. His primary research field is computational cognitive modeling, with specific interests in human-computer interaction and human performance simulation, and previous work in natural language processing. Together with David Meyer, of the University of Michigan Psychology Department, he developed the EPIC architecture for human cognitive and performance modeling, and has also developed simplified practical modeling methodologies based on GOMS for use in human-system design.

Anthony Hornof is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer and Information Science Department at the University of Oregon. His research is in human-computer visual interaction--improving the throughput between the user and the machine using the visual perceptual and oculomotor processes. Professor Hornof develops cognitive models as a means of understanding the strategies that people use to find things on a computer screen, ultimately to put these models at the core of a predictive tool that designers will use to evaluate visual layouts early in the design process. He uses eye tracking to evaluate and validate the models.

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Development of Cognitive Agents Using the COGNET Architecture and iGEN Toolset

Half-day tutorial (0915-1230)
in the XXX, room to be announced

Wayne Zachary and Michael Szczepkowski
CHI Systems Inc.
wzachary@chisystems.com

This tutorial introduces participants to COGNET and iGEN, an integrated cognitive/behavioral modeling method and toolset used to develop cognitive agents -- software components that exhibit a level of intelligence, which mimics human thought and behavior. Cognitive agents represent the logical transition of research on human information processing into practical application. Cognitive agents also represent a new and growing paradigm for research in decision support, intelligent human-computer interfaces, intelligent tutoring, etc., which allows cognitive models to brought to bear on problems of enhancing the interaction between people and information technology in complex work environments. COGNET/iGEN integrates computational models of expert-level human cognitive processes (e.g., an emphasis on representation of recognition-primed strategies employed by experts rather than the atomic-level constructive processes employed by novices) with many practical approaches from software and systems engineering (e.g., incorporation of well-structured external software interfaces to facilitate the integration of cognitive agents into a operational software environments) to provide a theoretically based yet practical framework for cognitive agent development. This workshop introduces participants to the concepts of cognitive agents and to the COGNET/iGEN method and tools for cognitive agent development, and prepares them to undertake the development of cognitive agents applications. Attendees are invited to bring their own laptops and will be given a (MS-Windows) CD with interactive material that can be used in the tutorial.

Please bring a laptop with you and indicate this on the registration form. Our plan is to have tutees work in pairs, so not to worry if you can't bring one.

Dr. Wayne Zachary is founder and President of CHI Systems Incorporated, a leading cognitive engineering company headquartered near Philadelphia. He led the development of the Cognition as a Network of Tasks (COGNET) framework for cognitive task analysis of real time, multi-tasking domains, and applied COGNET to diverse domains, ranging from military command and control to patient-physician clinical encounters. He holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology and Computer Science from Temple University. Prior to founding CHI Systems, he was Associate Professor of Information Systems at Drexel University. He developed and has taught prior versions of this tutorial for the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, the Cognitive Science Society, the Aviation Psychology Society, and the Behavioral Representation in Modeling and Simulation annual conference.

Mr. Michael Szczepkowski is a cognitive engineer at CHI Systems' Philadelphia regional office and manages the Cognitive Engineering Practice there. He holds a M.S. in Human Factors from S.U.N.Y. at Buffalo. He has used COGNET/iGEN to developed cognitive models used in numerous cognitive agents for instructional systems and decision support systems over the last decade. He developed the commercial training course curriculum for COGNET/iGEN and has instructed over one-hundred students in this course in the United States and Europe. He has also helped teach prior versions of this tutorial.

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Chair

Frank E. Ritter (Penn State)

Committee members

Glenn Gunzelman (USAF)
Randy Jones (Soar Tech and Colby College)
Josef Nerb (Freiburg)

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